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Monday, March 31, 2008

Service Chiefs to present joint memorandum on 6th Pay Panel

The Army, Navy and Air Force Chiefs are working on a joint memorandum pointing out the anomalies in the Sixth Pay Commission recommendations, which later would be handed over to the Finance Ministry.

The move is being taken to stave off misconceptions that soldiers and officers might have over the pay panel report, defence ministry sources said.

The three service chiefs had a meeting last week with Defence Minister AK Antony in which they sought a 40-60 per cent hike for armed forces personnel over and above the Pay Commission's recommendations.

Arguing that the Armed Forces deserve a better deal, Chairman of the Chiefs of Staff Committee, Admiral Sureesh Mehta also sought modifications in the Pay Commission proposals including that the military service pay (MSP) be levelled at 25 per cent of the basic pay for soldiers, personnel below officer rank and middle rung officers.
Source : The Hindu
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Arrear Calculator

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Still Confusing...

Even after a week of considerable discussion about the Sixth Pay Commission report, the media is still not very sure whether to laud or castigate it. There have been comments about the additional fiscal burden, comparisons with the private sector, the relevance of performance incentives, et al, but the media has been careful not to take on the bureaucracy by asking what the public will get in return. It has even accepted the costs to the Centre of about Rs30,000 crore in 2008-09 as inevitable.
Concern with retention at middle management levels is visible in the report. There has been evidence of flight of officers to the private sector after putting in 10-15 years in government, leveraging their knowledge of processes and people to

command a huge multiple of earnings in their new assignments. There have also been reports that the defence forces are finding it difficult to recruit officers, with managerial skills in demand in the real economy. The recommendations of the pay panel provide for a bulge in the benefits at these levels, in the hope of improving parity between the private and government sectors. Building on this platform, my ex-colleagues at senior levels have ensured there is enough gravy for them, as well (I do hope to get a good raise in my pension).
Thus, the balloon of benefits is larger at the middle and top end.
It’s more subdued at the lower end. The class of stenographers, the backbone of the notes and minutes that remain unchanged from the days of Curzon, is being done away with. The minimum–maximum ratio is being stretched from the present level of 1:9 to about 1:12, with lower benefits at the clerical and lower levels. There is little for the entrants, and indeed, at entry levels, several tasks are being removed. There is a strong recommendation for outsourcing lower-level service tasks. In this sense, the report is certainly elitist for, like the government and the important policymakers, it pays lip service to inclusive growth, but is tilted towards the upper end of skills and knowledge.
The government has paid little attention to job opportunities in the real economy. It’s recognized that mere literacy is not enough for skills creation, that there is a severe shortage of even ordinary skills needed in services, construction and manufacturing—but there’s been no coherent strategy to attempt to bridge the gap. There are many committees in this government, but none to tackle the problems of employment and livelihoods.
This pay commission report, to my mind, is yet another example of this bias towards the knowledge economy, the middle class and senior managers, the demand for FMCG and urban allowances. The small town aspirant, the first- generation school graduate, has little to look forward to. This is worrying at a time when we urgently need to take people off farms into service jobs, reduce pressure on land, and to move youngsters to service jobs.
There are other recommendations that may get distorted during implementation — such as the proposal to allow a higher (3.5%) rate of increment to 20% of the employees, categorized as “high performers”. It is tough to evolve measurable criteria at clerical levels. There will always be complaints of favouritism, of lack of transparency and recourse to RTI against these decisions. The running pay scales are unlikely to satisfy the demands for promotions, for elevations in government service bring substantial power and additional responsibility. The increases in education allowance and house rent allowance are marginal when compared with the rise in the costs of these services. It is not clear whether the medical insurance scheme aims to reduce the ambit of the Union government health scheme — if so, there would be substantial cuts in benefits for employees.
The position of the commission on the new pension schemes is not clear — it uses the words “new pensioners”, but since 1 January 2004, new entrants are on a contributory pension programme. Reductions in gazetted holidays may be seen as erosion of benefits. Lateral entry at higher levels, even in professional services, may not be welcomed. There are several such recommendations that may become subject to further negotiations between the government and employees before they are implemented.
At a conceptual level, the report fails to address the issues of service delivery. The incentive mechanisms are small: There is little to improve efficiencies or to punish inefficiencies. The running pay scales could be viewed by the public as yet another incentive for non–performance. Surprisingly, the Administrative Reforms Commission and the pay commission don’t seem to share views about improving processes and output measurement.
The report is, at best, a human relations exercise to keep the employees appeased in an election year.
One could consider it an opportunity missed to address fundamental issues in how the public services function, and to reward performance and castigate nonperformance.
Finally, it is not clear whether even at middle-management levels, the report will ensure loyalty and retention when compared with the incentives in the private sector.

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Bonanza for civil service only a catch-up

IT IS raining money for key sections of the electorate. After a please-all railway budget, which actually reduced air-conditioned first-class fares, and a general budget, which, among other lollipops, wrote off farm-sector loans to the tune of Rs600bil (RM47.9bil), it is now the turn of public servants to be offered a huge bonanza.

Central government employees are now set to get a 40% raise in salaries, causing an additional annual burden of nearly Rs130bil (RM10.4bil) on the exchequer.

Since the increase is to be effective from Jan 1, 2006, the one-time outgo on payment of arrears would tot up to over Rs180bil (RM14.4bil). Millions of pensioners too would gain from the revision.

Some 5 million central government employees, including members of the armed forces, will benefit from the recommendations of the Sixth Pay Commission headed by Justice B.N. Srikrishna, a retired judge of the Supreme Court.

Also, 6 million-odd employees of 26 state governments are bound to get similar increases in pay and perks. A 20% increase in salaries of employees of all state governments will entail an annual payout of over Rs460bil (RM36.8bil).

Since central government employees are set to get a 40% raise, it is unlikely that their counterparts in the states would settle for anything less.

Admittedly, there is a good case for substantial increases in government salaries. To begin with, it was necessary to offset the sharp rise in the cost of living since the last revision in 1996.

Private sector salaries in the intervening decade had more than doubled, in some cases trebled and quadrupled given the 9%-plus growth in the economy in recent years.

Besides, the government service is no longer the preferred profession of meritorious students. Even Class-I civil service jobs, including those in the elite foreign service, fail to attract the best talents from elite universities.

The problem is far more acute in the armed forces, with the officer corps suffering a huge shortage for want of suitable candidates.

Even after the proposed rise, a substantial gap between public and private sector salaries would persist.

However, the proposed revision would help address the problem to a considerable extent, especially when one considers that government service virtually offers life-long job security and post-retirement pension, health care etc, perks generally unavailable in the largely unorganised private sector.

A rough idea about the new salary structure of civil servants can be had from the fact that the Union Cabinet Secretary, considered the head of Indian bureaucracy, will see his monthly pay packet rise from the existing Rs67,000 to Rs103,000 (RM5,300 to RM8,200).

Secretaries to the Government of India, members of the elite Indian Administrative Service, will have their pay increased from Rs55,000 to Rs80,000 (RM4,400 to RM6,400).

A covenanted bureaucrat reaches the level of the secretary to the GOI after 30 or so years of service and very often spends about a couple of years in that position before retirement upon reaching the age of 60 years.

The pay commission has also fixed the minimum entry-level salary at Rs6,600 (RM527) a month as against the existing Rs4,400 (RM352). The minimum-to-maximum salary ratio has now been pegged at 1:12.

Notably, the existing salaries actually show the basic plus 50% dearness allowance, which gets automatically merged with the former after a certain period.

Also, the number of salary grades are to be reduced from the existing 35 to 20.

As for the armed forces, the chiefs of the three services will see their pay packets go up from the existing Rs30,000 (RM2,400) to Rs90,000 (RM7,200) while the starting salary for lieutenants (or equivalent in the navy and air force) would go up from Rs14,000 (RM1,100) to Rs25,200 (RM2,000).

At the level of the sepoy, the starting salary scale of Rs5,000-Rs7,000 (RM400-RM560) is set to rise to Rs10,670 (RM853).

However, a recommendation which is bound to prove most unpopular with government servants it that pertaining to a cut in the number of gazetted holidays.

The Commission has recommended that these be abolished altogether and, instead, only three national holidays, that is, Republic Day on Jan 26, Independence Day on Aug 15, and Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday on Oct 2, be allowed.

Meanwhile, at the popular level there is near unanimity that in spite of the handsome increases in their pay, there would not be any improvement in the quality of governance.

Ordinary Indians are certain that corruption, sloth, and inefficiency will continue to dog governments even after public servants get higher compensation, a challenge which no pay commission can tackle, especially given the virtual cast-iron job security.

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Saturday, March 29, 2008

Defence Ministry to send proposals to panel

Allahabad: : Reacting to the reported resentment of Defence personnel over the Sixth Pay Commission’s recommendations, Union Defence Minister A K Antony on Friday said senior ministry officers would soon send their suggestions to the Ministry of Finance regarding necessary changes.

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IPS officers also upset with Pay Commission

New Delhi, March 28 : After the Armed Forces, it’s the turn of the Indian Police Service officers to come out against “unfair” recommendations that could impact the efficiency and motivation of the service. The underlying theme in the services’ response to the recommendations of the Sixth Pay Commission is that officers of the service are fighting against serious threats to internal security and they should be recognised for that.

After taking stock of the report, the Central IPS Association has concluded that the recommendations are “not very cogent” and “much below expectation”. A six-point critique refers to the recommendation that places Directors General of state police at disadvantage vis-à-vis DGs of Central paramilitary forces. DGs of Border Security Force, Central Reserve Police Force, Central Industrial Security Force, Indo-Tibetan Border Police and Sashastra Seema Bal are in the pay band of Rs 80,000.

Arguing that the responsibilities and problems faced by DGs of several states are in no way less than those faced by the heads of Central paramilitary forces, the association has asked for equal pay — the apex scale of Rs 80,000 — for all DGs, whether in a CPMF or in a state. “The downgrading of the status of DGP who is the in-charge of internal security shall have its own repercussions — a DGP traditionally equates in status with Chief Secretary,” the association said after an emergency meeting on Thursday.

The service’s pet grouse, relating to the rank of Deputy Inspector General, has also found mention. The association has been demanding abolition of the “anomalous post”. Instead of doing this, the Pay Commission has put them at greater disadvantage vis-à-vis DIG-level officers from other services. The association’s demand: merge their rank with the higher band of Rs 39,200 to Rs 67,000, as officers at this level constitute the bulk of the supervisory level — from the 1986 to 1994 batches.

Other issues highlighted are parity in Grade Pay between IAS and IPS officers; a hardship or risk allowance on the lines of that recommended for the Army and pay parity to all ranks in all services. “Many of the recommendations are unfair and likely to violate the principle of equity and equitability between the services,” association secretary Manjari Jharuhar and joint secretary A P Maheshwari pointed out in a statement issued after the meeting.

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Friday, March 28, 2008

Calculator Updated

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Thursday, March 27, 2008

Armed forces demand separate Pay Commission

The Sixth Pay Commission report has left the military dissatisfied.

The military top brass on Thursday met Defence Minister AK Antony demanding higher salaries in order to curb attrition.

The defence forces have also demanded a separate Pay Commission to look at their grievances in addition to the present report.

There were no takers for two-thirds of the seats at military academies this year, and the hike addresses that concern. The entry-level officers get an almost 100 per cent jump.

However, the Commission fails the military at its middle rung — the level where many are queuing up to quit. Those with 20 years of service and more, get a real increase of less than 15 per cent.

“We were expecting around 200 per cent hike,” Chief of Army Staff General Deepak Kapoor says.

Rankers too are disappointed. The hike they get is between Rs 1000 and Rs 2000.

“What sort of education can a colonel provide to his children with the salary that he takes home, which is around Rs 25,000 – 27,000?” says VP Career Launchers Colonel (Retd) Gopal Karaunakaran.

Another factor that rankles the military is the Pay Commission model, which seeks a balance between military and civil ranks.

A civilian IAS officer takes under 20 years to become a Joint Secretary with virtual certainty.

And it takes army officers 33 years to reach the equivalent rank of Major General, and only three per cent make it to this rank.

Soldiers complain that the comparison is unfair and press for a separate Pay Commission for the military.

“When my daughter was born in Kerala, I was at Siachen. I came to know about it four days later through a telegram. So can you compensate that?” Karaunakaran asks.

Perhaps, the Pay Commission has failed to sense the feeling of inadequacy in a seething military.

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Antony hears out military chiefs on pay panel report

India’s military chiefs Thursday met Defence Minister A.K. Antony to convey to him their disappointment over a pay panel’s recommendations, saying it fell far short of their expectations. “The minister gave them a patient hearing. He promised to examine their suggestions after studying the report,” an official said of the one-and-a-half-hour long meeting that was pre-scheduled but was dominated by the report of the Sixth Pay Commission that was presented Monday.

“This was the first step of the process. The service chiefs will formalise their views and these will then be presented to the commission,” the official told IANS, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Defence Secretary Vijay Singh, Indian Army chief Gen. Deepak Kapoor, Indian Navy chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta and Indian Air Force chief Air Chief Marshal Fali Major attended the meeting, which was conducted without any aides.

The commission, headed by B.N. Srikrishna, a former Supreme Court judge, has recommended a 40 percent across-the-board pay hike for armed forces personnel, doubling of their allowances and military service pay (MSP) for officers up to the rank of brigadier and equivalent.

“The report has created quite some confusion. There was euphoria on the day after the report was presented with the media going to town with reports of a bonanza for the armed forces,” the official pointed out.

“The reality began to sink in the next day when it became clear that leave alone a bonanza, the armed forces had been treated most unfairly and that the wage hike, in real terms would be nowhere near 40 percent or even half of that,” the official explained.

Toward this end, the service chiefs focused on four key areas during their meeting with Antony.

Firstly, they maintained that their demand for parity with civilian employees had not been addressed. They were also not happy with the military service pay that has been recommended in a bid to reduce this disparity, the official said.

Then, they pointed out that after taking into account taxes and other deductions, the wage hike in real terms would amount to only 20 percent.

Besides, the service chiefs contended that PBORs had received a raw deal in the commission’s recommendations, the official said.

Antony has been guarded in his reaction to the commission’s report.

“I will not comment now. Let me first study the report and discuss it with all concerned. I will react after that,” Antony told reporters on the sidelines of a defence awards function here Wednesday.

The fact that the service chiefs were disappointed was clearly indicated by Admiral Sureesh Mehta.

“We will closely study the report and then meet the pay commission,” he told reporters on the sidelines of another defence function here Wednesday.

The wage increases recommended by the pay panel could see the top generals getting as much as Rs.90,000 a month.

The recommendations translate into a take-home package - before tax - of Rs.25,760 for officers at the entry level of lieutenants and equivalent and rising to a maximum of Rs.65,090 for lieutenant generals and their equivalents.

The vice chiefs of the three services and army commanders and equivalents - also three-star officers - will get a fixed salary of Rs.80,000 per month.

In the case of PBORs, the commission has recommended that at the entry level, sepoys (privates) and their equivalents receive a minimum of Rs.7,860, rising to a maximum of Rs.40,600 for subedar majors and their equivalents.

The commission has also recommended military service pay of Rs.6,000 for officers up to the level of brigadier and equivalent and of Rs.1,000 for PBORs.

The recommendations will entail additional annual expenditure of Rs.63.86 billion ($1.5 billion) in the defence sector, the commission said in its report. It also said the exchequer would stand to save Rs.18 billion if its other recommendations are implemented.

The report will now go to the cabinet for its consideration.


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Lesser Holidays

Sixth Pay Commission has, thereby stirring up a hornet's nest, is to abolish the idea of "gazetted" holidays, which in government parlance means days when all central government offices, irrespective of where they are located, are closed.

Instead of "gazetted" holidays, there should be only three national holidays, says the Commission. In addition, employees will be given the option of taking leave on eight restricted holidays to be declared by the government at the start of the year.

Heads of individual departments will be allowed the option of declaring the office closed for a maximum of two restricted holidays in a year based on local considerations (like transport availability or the nature of the festival) and in consultation with the employees. All employees will be deemed to have availed of their restricted holidays on those two days.

Thus, the total number of holidays for central government employees will be reduced from 171 to 165 days, if the Sixth Pay Commission's recommendations are accepted. The loss of even six holidays will hurt the government employees, particularly when they realise that the actual increase in their pay packages has been fairly moderate.

Though the idea of doing away with "gazetted" holidays (most of which are on account of religious festivals) is commendable, there will be many practical problems in implementing it. Employees may still be convinced and persuaded to accept a reduced number of holidays in a year. But the very thought of implementing the new system will give nightmares to heads of departments in various government offices.

Consider how the head of a department of a central government office in New Delhi will handle the situation. It is likely that the two restricted holidays when he would have the office closed will be for Holi and Diwali. That would mean that he would have to keep the office open on Dussehra, Christmas and on a few other religious holidays, even though most of the employees would have availed of their restricted holidays on those days. If the department is engaged in public-dealing, then the problem gets even more complicated.

The head of the department has to deploy adequate staff to maintain the services, incurring additional costs on over-time payments. The government's overall maintenance costs will also go up as offices can be closed only on five days in a year, compared to 17 days earlier.

This is not to argue that abolishing "gazetted" holidays is a bad idea. As a matter of principle, "gazetted" holidays on account of religious festivals should have been scrapped long ago. Most private sector companies manage with ten or even fewer holidays on account of these festivals and allow their offices in different regions follow their own schedule within an overall cap on the total number of holidays.

If the private sector can manage this, there is no reason why the government or its departments across the country cannot follow a similar system.

Decisions on all holidays except the three national holidays can be taken by the local offices in consultation with their headquarters. The local offices will also have to be empowered to take decisions on how to run their departments on days there will be poor attendance because of these restricted holidays.

The point is that the Sixth Pay Commission's recommendation on abolishing "gazetted" holidays can be implemented only when the central government is prepared to take a host of other downstream steps to reform the administrative system.

The Fifth Pay Commission also had recommended that government offices should remain closed only on national holidays and the employees should be given a larger number of restricted holidays. That recommendation was not accepted. The Sixth Pay Commission has made a stronger case for abolishing "gazetted" holidays. The government should not reject this idea without giving it a serious try.

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Salary hike 'peanuts', Govt employees cry foul

The feel good factor that the pay hike to Central Government employees was to create is not happening. A majority of them say the Sixth Pay Commission gave them a raw deal and the hike is peanuts.

"Vested interests and lobbies working against us did not allow a hike to happen," says D N Sahoo of the CCS forum.

Here are the facts:

Group B, C and D employees - who constitute the majority 40 lakh odd pool of central workers - may have got an increment of about 20 per cent, but in money terms, that amounts to a hike of between Rs 1,000 and Rs 3,000.

This, as opposed to Group A officers (joint secretary level and above) who got a 50 per cent hike, translating to a raise between Rs 20,000 and Rs 30,000.

Another anomaly: if earlier, a financial upgrade was assured after 12 and 24 years of service, it's now been moved to between 18 and 50 years. Whoever worked that long, protesting employees want to know.

"As a part of the dharna, we will not let any Commissioner or Joint Commissioner-level officer to enter office premises," says employees' union leader, Dalip Singh.

In an election year, the Sixth Pay Commission was essentially meant as a tactic to woo the 40 lakh-strong votebank.

But the only people feeling good about the pay hike are a handful of bureaucrats who probably do not even take out time to cast their vote.
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Unhappy with Pay panel, service chiefs to meet Antony

NEW DELHI: : With the Armed Forces expressing extreme disappointment over recommendations of the Sixth Pay Commission, the three service chiefs are meeting Defence Minister A K Antony on Thursday to point out anomalies and raise concerns.

Sources said the Armed Forces are drawing up a joint report on the recommendations, pointing out glaring differences in the pay structure of the services in comparison to the civil set-up. The report also brings out that in real terms, the Armed Forces would be getting a hike of less than 25 per cent across the board.

"There are anomalies that need to be corrected. We will make recommendations to the Pay Commission," Navy Chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta, who is also the Chairman of the Chiefs of Staff Committee, said. Ministry sources said that while Thursday's meeting between the service chiefs and Antony is "routine", the Pay Commission report will dominate the conference. Earlier, the Defence Minister refused to react on the report. "Let me first discuss the issue with all concerned. Then I will give a reaction," he said.

"It became clear that the recommendations of the Pay Commission will translate to a measly 20-25 per cent hike for most people. This will not address the issue of retention nor the shortage of officers at the entry level," a senior officer said.

Among other things, the three chiefs are expected to raise the issue of the new Military Service Pay which Armed Forces term as grossly unfair. The MSP will not be considered for arrears nor will it be eligible for a yearly increment. While Army Chief Deepak Kapoor said that "we are studying the recommendations" and would give "cogent suggestions", Air Chief FH Major, went a step ahead to say that the recommendations require a "relook".

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Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Confederation of central government employees threatens strong action

Expressing "extreme disappointment" at the Sixth Pay Commission report, the confederation of central government employees on Tuesday asked the government to re-negotiate the deal with them and threatened strong action otherwise.

"The minimum wages have been fixed at Rs 6,600 per month as against our demand of Rs 10,000," the CCGE said.

The employees are extremely disappointed as it is just not acceptable, the association said. Asking the government to re-negotiate the entire report with it, the CCGE said "we would definitely react very strongly if that is not done".

Updated Sixth Pay Commission Calculator

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Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Pros and cons of Sixth Pay Commission and its impact on people

The sixth pay commission yesterday submitted its report to Union Finance Minister P Chidambaram recommending hefty increment in the current salary of Central Government Employees to establish the government employees equivalent to private sectors' employees, as per sixth pay commission claimed in its report.

The Commission has recommended hiking 20- 40% salary from the current salary structure and it would now be two to three folds in terms of gross salary as against the current basic salary.
 
This margin increment would put an additional burden on Central Exchequer of Rs. 7,975-crore per year while a lump sum of Rs. 18,060-crore will be spent in paying the credit money of employees in the form of arrears as the commission has recommended to implement the salary structure from January 01, 2006 and the difference of this period would be paid in the 'arrear' form, as per the commission's submitted report.

The minimum salary, as per commission's recommendation would be Rs.6,600 while the maximum salary would be Rs. 80,000 (except Central Secretary's salary that is recommended to Rs.90,000-per month) that will be two to three times from the current basic salary and will damage the exchequer of states as now the states will also have to follow the Central's pay structure because the states' employees will demand the similar status from their government.

As per pay commission's record, the recommendations of the second pay commission had put the additional average burden on exchequer of Rs. 39-crore that were extended after every pay commission's recommendation. It rose to Rs 144 crore, Rs 1,282 crore and Rs 17,000 crore in the third, fourth and fifth recommendations respectively.

Now, it is estimated that it may go to Rs.20,000-crore (excluding savings of the states) in the 2008-09, while pay commissions earlier reported that up to 90% of the total revenue were spent only in paying the salary and pension of the employees and beneficiaries. This recommendation might prove the 'panic' decision for the state governments.

On the other hand, for the employees and pensioners, this recommendation can be proved as a 'golden hen' that can boost the living status of the government's employees and can also eradicate the complaint of the beneficiaries who always accuse 'government' for giving such low salary in which they can hardly survive in these inflammatory circumstances.

A lower and lower-middle class family (the maximum number of persons belongs to these categories and highly depended on their salary) usually seeks the normal living standard including bread-and-butter, cheap and best shelter, moderate clothes, good education for their children, sufficient medical facilities, average status of marriage of their children, reasonable living status and adequate money after retirement. The pay commission evaluates all these things and decides the parameter of the salary scale as it claims.

According to sixth pay commission report, 'It was mandatory to raise the broad increment in the government employees' salary to prevent the migration and to compete with the private sectors.' The trend of migrating from government jobs to private sectors jobs have been increased since last four-five years as the salary difference between both the sector's employee were increasing rapidly.
 
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Pay Commission Calculator Updated

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Sixth Pay commission Calculator wrong

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Sixth Pay Commission : Pay Calculator

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Monday, March 24, 2008

Sixth Pay commission New Pay Scale

Pre-Revised

Revised

Pay Scale

Pay Scale

Pay Band

Corresponding Pay Bands

Grade Pay

S-1

2550-55-2660-60-3200

-1S

4440-7440

1300

S-2

2610-60-3150-65-3540

-1S

4440-7440

1400

S-2A

2610-60-2910-65-3300-70-4000

-1S

4440-7440

1600

S-3

2650-65-3300-70-4000

-1S

4440-7440

1650

S-4

2750-70-3800-75-4400

PB-1

4860-20200

1800

S-5

3050-75-3950-80-4590

PB-1

4860-20200

1900

S-6

3200-85-4900

PB-1

4860-20200

2000

S-7

4000-100-6000

PB-1

4860-20200

2400

S-8

4500-125-7000

PB-1

4860-20200

2800

S-9

5000-150-8000

PB-2

8700-34800

4200

S-10

5500-175-9000

PB-2

8700-34800

4200

S-11

6500-200-6900

PB-2

8700-34800

4200

S-12

6500-200-10500

PB-2

8700-34800

4200

S-13

7450-225-11500

PB-2

8700-34800

4600

S-14

7500-250-12000

PB-2

8700-34800

4800

S-15

8000-275-13500

PB-2

8700-34800

5400

S-16

9000

PB-3

15600-39100

5400

S-17

9000-275-9550

PB-3

15600-39100

5400

S-18

10325-325-10975

PB-3

15600-39100

6100

S-19

10000-325-15200

PB-3

15600-39100

6100

S-20

10650-325-15850

PB-3

15600-39100

6500

S-21

12000-375-16500

PB-3

15600-39100

6600

S-22

12750-375-16500

PB-3

15600-39100

7500

S-23

12000-375-18000

PB-3

15600-39100

7600

S-24

14300-400-18300

PB-3

15600-39100

7600

S-25

15100-400-18300

PB-3

15600-39100

8300

S-26

16400-450-20000

PB-3

15600-39100

8400

S-27

16400-450-20900

PB-3

15600-39100

8400

S-28

14300-450-22400

PB-4

39200-67000

9000

S-29

18400-500-22400

PB-4

39200-67000

9000

S-30

22400-525-24500

PB-4

39200-67000

11000

S-31

22400-600-26000

PB-4

39200-67000

13000

S-32

24050-650-26000

PB-4

39200-67000

13000

S-33

26000(Fixed)

Apex Scale

80000 (Fixed)

NIL

S-34

30000 (Fixed)

Cab.Sec./Equ.

90000 (Fixed)

NIL